Classical Liberalism

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To libertarians, it is short for "classical liberal economics" or "classical economics": pre-marginalist, pre-Keynesian economics such as Manchesterism. That has nothing to do with POLITICAL liberal ideas such as democracy. Libertarian use of the term classical liberalism is designed to ignore the political goals that early liberals actually stood for. By cherry-picking quotes and positions, and ignoring much, libertarians claim classical liberals were just like modern libertarians and neoliberals. This is part of an attempt to claim another term, the way libertarianism was stolen.

Links

The Liberal Idea [More...]
Stephen Holmes sketches out a set of claims that are broadly characteristic of liberal political thought since the time of the classical liberals until now.
A False Distinction [More...]
The liberal tradition is about far more than questions of economics, as important as those questions are. Modern liberalism did not start with the New Deal and end with The War on Poverty. What my critics call modern liberalism is instead the logical and sociological outcome of classical liberalism. That is why Adam Smith is a liberal and twentieth century libertarians such as Hayek are not.
Classical Liberalism and Classical Liberals [More...]
A large list of classical liberals displaying the huge diversity of their views, including many pro-grovernment or anti-capitalist liberals such as American founders, Rousseau, Kant, Bentham, etc. Libertarians like to misrepresent them with only a list of conservative economists.
For Fancy Racists, Classical Liberalism Offers Respect, Intrigue [More...]
On the origin of the modern usage of classical liberal. "Alas, the term “classical liberal” would have been novel to Smith, Locke or Mill. Mill called himself a socialist, Locke called for a state ban on Catholicism, and Smith favored all manner of encroachments against the free market."
Millian Liberalism and the Irish Famine [More...]
Tyler Cowen wrote that progressivism needed a does of Millian liberalism because it endorsed eugenics. Henry Farrell points out that Millian liberalism was guilty of much greater actual crimes during the Irish Famine.
Non-Libertarians Supposedly Supporting Libertarian Viewpoints (10 links)
Many economists and historical figures are claimed to be supportive of libertarianism or "protolibertarians". US founding fathers, various economists, J. S. Mill, etc. Often they are mischaracterized as "Classical Liberals" to confuse the issue. Many were just early liberals or feminists.
Of Means and Ends: Liberals and Libertarians [More...]
Libertarians such as David Boaz claim that they are the true descendants of classical liberals. There have been many attempts to steal the word liberalism: libertarians are simply making another.
One Liberalism [More...]
I’m frequently asked which liberalism I favor: “classical liberalism” with its preference for the market and its belief in individual freedom, or “modern liberalism” and its reliance on the state and commitment to equality. One thing I know is this tendency to see two different kinds of liberalism is wrong... Autonomy and equality are goals that transcend the classical/modern divide.

Quotations

The liberal tradition is about far more than questions of economics, as important as those questions are. Modern liberalism did not start with the New Deal and end with The War on Poverty. What my critics call modern liberalism is instead the logical and sociological outcome of classical liberalism. That is why Adam Smith is a liberal and twentieth century libertarians such as Hayek are not.
Alan Wolfe, "A False Distinction"
"Let them eat liberty and secure property rights" is not an efficacious program for immediate famine relief, whatever its abstract and/or long term merits.
Henry Farrell, "Millian Liberalism and the Irish Famine"
Without exception the great thinkers of classical liberalism, like Benjamin Constant, Thomas Babington Macaulay and John Stuart Mill, viewed universal suffrage democracy as a threat to property rights and capitalism.
Michael Lind, "Why libertarians apologize for autocracy"
The dread of democracy by libertarians and classical liberals is justified. Libertarianism really is incompatible with democracy. Most libertarians have made it clear which of the two they prefer. The only question that remains to be settled is why anyone should pay attention to libertarians.
Michael Lind, "Why libertarians apologize for autocracy"