Framing

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Framing is a classic rhetorical technique that attempts to sneak in assumptions. Control the assumptions, and you shape the discussion. If your opponent disagrees, he is either distracted from making his own argument to attack the assumptions or he is put on the defensive. The classic framing example is Groucho Marx's "when did you stop beating your wife?". So why are you in favor of coercive government?

See also Libertarian Propaganda Terms as they are often used in framing.

Links

Don't Be Churlish About Taxes; Look To Scandinavia [More...]
" I suggest right here and now that we regain the framing on taxes. Especially in the age of Trump, we need to make tax evasion to be the act of someone who hates this country, not of being "smart."... Taxes are the costs for living in a society. We should want to make this nation a stronger society, not begrudge our contribution to the nation's collective happiness."
Libertarian Framing
A 24 word statement demonstrates 7 libertarian framing tricks. "Why on earth are you in favor of giving the state any more governmental power than is absolutely unavoidable? It'll just be abused."
Libertarianism Makes You Stupid [More...]
After 20 years, still one of the shortest, clearest explanations of the fundamental errors of libertarian rhetoric.
Listen Libertarians! Part 1 [More...]
Part I of David Ellerman's review of John Tomasi’s Free Market Fairness. The fundamental consent-versus-coercion misframing.
Listen Libertarians! Part 2 [More...]
Part 2 of David Ellerman's review of John Tomasi’s Free Market Fairness. The misframing of property theory.
Listen Libertarians! Part 3 [More...]
Part 3 of David Ellerman's review of John Tomasi’s Free Market Fairness. The misframing about "productive property".
Listen Libertarians! Part 4 [More...]
Part 4 of David Ellerman's review of John Tomasi’s Free Market Fairness. Liberalism’s faux "inalienable rights" theory.
Listen Libertarians! Part 5 [More...]
Part 5 of David Ellerman's review of John Tomasi’s Free Market Fairness. The property invisible hand mechanism.
The correct way to argue with Milton Friedman [More...]
[...] listen out for the words “Let us assume” or “Let’s suppose” and immediately jump in and say “No, let’s not assume that”.
The worthless Lockean Fable of Initial Acquisition
The ahistorical labor theory of property fails in many ways. Including ignoring the evidence in front of our noses.
Turning the tables: The pathologies and unrealized promise of libertarianism [More...]
"Libertarianism is a confused political outlook resting on misunderstanding key terms essential to its message, such as contract, property right, individuals, coercion, and democracy. In an internal critique of its key tenets and major thinkers it is shown to have failed in its chief project: outlining a genuine philosophy of freedom and well-being."
Why the 'Libertarian Moment' Isn't Really Happening [More...]
"Young voters are not libertarian, nor even trending libertarian. Neither, for that matter, are older voters. The "libertarian moment" is not an event in American culture. It's a phase in internal Republican Party factionalism."

Quotations

The key to understanding this, and to understanding Libertarianism itself, is to realize that their concept of individual freedom is the "whopper" of "right to have the State back up business". That's a wild definition of freedom.
Seth Finkelstein, "Libertarianism Makes You Stupid"
Libertarians are for "individual rights", and against "force" and "fraud" - just as THEY define it. Their use of these words, however, when examined in detail, is not likely to accord with the common meanings of these terms.
Seth Finkelstein, "Libertarianism Makes You Stupid"