Liberalism

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Liberalism differs substantially from libertarianism. All modern first-world nations are liberal. There are no libertarian communities, let alone nations. When libertarians refer favorably to liberalism, they mean only the economics of some early liberalism. Not the political aspects of liberalism, such as democracy, separations of powers, etc.

Links

The Liberal Idea [More...]
Stephen Holmes sketches out a set of claims that are broadly characteristic of liberal political thought since the time of the classical liberals until now.
A False Distinction [More...]
The liberal tradition is about far more than questions of economics, as important as those questions are. Modern liberalism did not start with the New Deal and end with The War on Poverty. What my critics call modern liberalism is instead the logical and sociological outcome of classical liberalism. That is why Adam Smith is a liberal and twentieth century libertarians such as Hayek are not.
Classical Liberalism (8 links)
To libertarians, it is short for "classical liberal economics" or "classical economics": pre-marginalist, pre-Keynesian economics such as Manchesterism. That has nothing to do with POLITICAL liberal ideas such as democracy. Libertarian use of the term classical liberalism is designed to ignore the political goals that early liberals actually stood for. By cherry-picking quotes and positions, and ignoring much, libertarians claim classical liberals were just like modern libertarians and neoliberals. This is part of an attempt to claim another term, the way libertarianism was stolen.
Liberals, you must reclaim Adam Smith [More...]
David Brin denounces modern libertarians and their selective citation of Adam Smith. Brin calls for progressive reforms to bring capitalism back to Smithian competition.
One Liberalism [More...]
I’m frequently asked which liberalism I favor: “classical liberalism” with its preference for the market and its belief in individual freedom, or “modern liberalism” and its reliance on the state and commitment to equality. One thing I know is this tendency to see two different kinds of liberalism is wrong... Autonomy and equality are goals that transcend the classical/modern divide.
Ordoliberalism (Wikipedia) [More...]
Ordoliberalism is the German variant between social liberalism and neoliberalism that emphasises the need for the state to ensure that the free market produces results close to its theoretical potential.
Ordoliberalism, Neoliberalism and Economics [More...]
"Ordoliberalism sees a vital role for the state, in ensuring that markets stay close to some notion of an ideal market. In particular, ordoliberals believe that without a strong government powerful private interests would undermine competition."
People’s Policy Project [More...]
People’s Policy Project (3P) is a think tank founded in 2017 by Matt Bruenig. The primary mission of 3P is to publish ideas and analysis that assist in the development of an economic system that serves the many, not the few. Funded through Patreon, to avoid the compromises typically demanded by monied interests.

Quotations

The liberal tradition is about far more than questions of economics, as important as those questions are. Modern liberalism did not start with the New Deal and end with The War on Poverty. What my critics call modern liberalism is instead the logical and sociological outcome of classical liberalism. That is why Adam Smith is a liberal and twentieth century libertarians such as Hayek are not.
Alan Wolfe, "A False Distinction"
It seems to me that there are five areas in which government spending has a demonstrated superiority over the private sector -- health and disability insurance, education, old-age pensions, infrastructure spending, and military spending. It seemed to me that structural changes in our economy and society were driving the amount of money we ought to spend in sum on those five up, hence the enlargement of government.
Brad DeLong, "Nick Eberstadt and the "Takers" Once Again: More Reflections on the General Theory of the Moocher Class"
Authority and liberty are interdependent, not simply opposed. As Kant, among others, made dear, rights (including property rights) are defined and enforced by the state. Referring to "natural rights," Emile Durkheim convincingly wrote that "the State creates these rights, gives them an institutional form, and makes them into realities." To violate liberal rights is to disobey the liberal state. In a sovereignless condition, rights can be imagined but not experienced. In a society with a weak state, such as Lebanon for the past decade, rights themselves are weak or underenforced. Statelessness means rightlessness, as the story of migrating Kurds, Vietnamese and Caribbean boat people, and many others should by now have made abundantly clear.
Stephen Holmes, "The Liberal Idea"