Mont Pelerin Society

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An international organization founded by Friedrich von Hayek to promote neoliberalism. Where the Koch brothers found their kindred spirits. One of the many vast, right-wing Conspiracies.

Links

Hayek, Friedman, and the Illusions of Conservative Economics [More...]
Robert Solow's review of "The Great Persuasion: Reinventing Free Markets since the Depression" By Angus Burgin. His view of the Mont Pelerin Society's transition from the leadership of Friedrich von Hayek to Milton Friedman.
Milton Friedman and David Glasner: Real and Pseudo Gold Standards [More...]
David Glasner identifies many flaws in Milton Friedman's paper “Real and Pseudo Gold Standards”. Brad DeLong interprets it as a political peacemaking tool, rather than a real academic paper.
The Chicago boys' economy - consequences [More...]
The philosophy of the Chicago School, Mont Pelerin Society etc claims that letting the pure, unfettered, global markets work without interference will entail prosperity, happiness, freedom and peace. They claim to be freedom fighters. 'Freedom' in this philosophy is in reality the liberty for ordinary people to increase their debt and for multinational companies, big multinational brands and chain stores to wipe out local brands and small family stores, replacing them with global brands and megastores.
The Road from Mont Pelerin: The Making of the Neoliberal Thought Collective (book, online)
A history of the origins of neoliberalism, featuring several notable libertarians.
Yet Another Note on Mont Pelerin: Thinking Some More About Bob Solow’s View… [More...]
Brad DeLong sees a good Hayek, a bad Hayek, and a political economy Hayek. The three are inconsistent. He (citing Solow) compares their faults to those of Milton Friedman.

Quotations

One incident above all impressed George and me. In the course of a spirited discussion of policies about the distribution of income among a group that included Hayek, Machlup, Knight, Robbins, and Jewkes among others, Ludwig von Mises suddenly rose to his feet, remarked, “You’re all a bunch of socialists,” and stomped out of the room.
Milton Friedman, "Tribute to George J. Stigler, Mont Pelerin Society General Meeting, Vancouver, Canada, September 4, 1992"