Two Treatises on Government

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Locke, John. 1689. Two Treatises on Government.

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Description

One of the major parents of early liberalism. The "mixing of labor to make property" claim comes from here.

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Quotations

But we know God hath not left one man so to the mercy of another, that he may starve him if he please: God the Lord and Father of all has given no one of his children such a property in his peculiar portion of the things of this world, but that he has given his needy brother a right to the surplusage of his goods; so that it cannot justly be denied him, when his pressing wants call for it: and therefore no man could ever have a just power over the life of another by right of property in land or possessions; since it would always be a sin, in any man of estate, to let his brother perish for want of affording him relief out of his plenty.
John Locke, "Two Treatises on GovernmentTwo Treatises on Government, Chapter 4, §. 42."