We libertarians are rational, they are not.

From Critiques Of Libertarianism
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People's thinking is based upon their values and premises. You cannot judge somebody else's rationality without adopting their values and premises for the judgement. There is very little evidence that libertarians do that, or judge fairly. Instead, the vulgar libertarian "logic" simply identifies that other people don't hold the same values or premises. See also Homo economicus.

Links

Motivated Rejection Of Science [More...]
They find that endorsement of a laissez-faire conception of free-market economics predicts rejection of climate science and other established scientific findings, such as the facts that HIV causes AIDS and that smoking causes lung cancer.
Homo economicus (9 links)
The idea that humans are rational, economic maximizers. A common, simplifying assumption in most economic models, also known as economic rationality. It is also commonly agreed that this assumption is false. Behavioral studies with the Ultimatum Game are good evidence that it is false.
Individual Choice (1 link)
Individual choice is a misleading concept: individuals do not control the choices available and are heavily influenced by advertising, propaganda, and other irrational factors. It also focuses attention away from alternatives, such as social choice.
Libertarian Velikovskyism
Understanding libertarians as like believers in Immanuel Velikovsky's "Worlds in Collision".
Rational != Self-interested [More...]
"Rationality and self-interest are two dimensions of behavior[...] You can pursue non-self-interested goals in rational or irrational ways, and you can pursue self-interested goals in rational or irrational ways."
Rational Fools: A Critique of the Behavioral Foundations of Economic Theory [More...]
Nobel prize winner Amartya Sen rejects the simple egoism of economic man, as well as universal moral systems, and points out that "Groups intermediate between oneself and all, such as class and community, provide the focus of many actions involving commitment."
Reddit AnCapCopyPasta [More...]
"Quick access for Anarcho-Capitalists to copy/paste material and win any argument instantly." Note the ridiculous equation "copying=winning". Because libertarians are generally incapable of thinking for themselves, and must plagiarize. A veritable catalog of common, stupid AnCap arguments.
Social Contract Theory (Cognitive Psychology) (2 links)
A modular and evolutionary view of human reasoning. "Modular" means that the theory explains performance in one specific content domain: social contracts (any social exchange.) Explains our apparent cheater detection algorithms. Not related to philosophical ideas of Social Contract.
The pseudoscience of libertarian morality. [More...]
An extended critical discussion of the pseudoscientific article "Understanding Libertarian Morality: The Psychological Roots of an Individualist Ideology" by Ravi Iyer et al.
The Science of Why We Don't Believe Science [More...]
"Motivated reasoning" helps explain why we libertarians (among others) are so polarized over matters where the evidence is so unequivocal. It would seem that expecting people to be convinced by the facts flies in the face of, you know, the facts.
The ugly delusions of the educated conservative [More...]
Chris Mooney explains the "smart idiot" effect of conservatism (and libertarianism is a form of conservatism): "politically sophisticated or knowledgeable people are often more biased, and less persuadable, than the ignorant."

Quotations

Libertarians are a strange bunch. They are the most predictable of political thinkers since the answer to every social problem is the exact same thing: The cause of the problem is government and the solution is less government. Full stop.
John Jackson, "Frank Chodorov: Scrappy Libertarian, Crappy Oracle"
… Libertarians’ delight in considering themselves rough-and-tumble, independent thinkers. I can’t help noticing however, that their fierce independent thinking often matches perfectly with powerful business and corporate interests.
John Jackson, "Frank Chodorov: Scrappy Libertarian, Crappy Oracle"
There are some men -- it’s almost always men -- who become enraged at any suggestion that they must give up something they want for the common good. Often, the rage is disproportionate to the sacrifice: for example, prominent conservatives suggesting violence against government officials because they don’t like the performance of phosphate-free detergent. But polluter’s rage isn’t about rational thought.
Paul Krugman, "The Id That Ate the Planet"